Call for papers

GENERAL INFORMATION

Submissions must be sent in Word format (Times New Roman, 12 pts, 1.5 line spacing) to info [@] espaceartactuel [.] com. Unless otherwise indicated, they should be original and previously unpublished work. Please include a brief biography of the writer (70-80 words for reviews, 80-100 words for other sections), as well as their mailing and email addresses.

The editorial committee reviews all submissions and reserves the right to accept or refuse any articles. Texts that present a potential conflict of interest between the author and subject will not be considered.

Submissions are evaluated on the following criteria: relevance to the mandate of ESPACE art actuel magazine, clarity of expression, quality of analysis and originality.

The editorial committee, overseen by the Editor-in-chief André-Louis Paré, consists of Mélanie Boucher, Peter Dubé, Bénédicte Ramade, Aseman Sabet, Bernard Schütze and Mathieu Teasdale.

The magazine will pay $65 per 250-word page (excluding footnotes), up to a maximum of $260 for exhibition reviews and $520 for texts in other sections.

1. EXHIBITION REVIEWS section

a) An exhibition review will have 800 to 1000 words, and will address a solo or group exhibition in Quebec, Canada or abroad.
b) Apart from exceptional cases, the exhibition reviewed should not have ended more than four months prior to the release of the issue in which the review will be published.
c) The title of the review should be limited to the title of the exhibition, and include the artist’s name if it is a solo exhibition.
d) The header should also include the venue and dates of the exhibition.
e) Intertitles should be avoided and footnotes should be kept to a minimum, if at all.
f) Images, with full captions, to accompany the text are welcome but not mandatory.
g) A proposal should be sent by e-mail to alpare [@] espaceartactuel [.] com as soon as possible before the deadline. The editor-in-chief’s preliminary approval of this proposal does not mean that the submission of the completed text is accepted. The editorial committee must still review the final text for acceptance or rejection.

The next deadline for exhibition reviews is May 4, 2020.

2. EVENTS section

a) The texts in the Events section are reviews of large-scale exhibitions, particularly biennales or other artistic events involving several venues.
b) A review in the Events section will be 1500 to 2000 words.
c) Apart from exceptional cases, the event reviewed should not have ended more than four months prior to the release of the issue in which the review will be published.
d) The title should include the name of the event, but not necessarily limited to it.
e) The header should also include the venues and dates of the event.
f) Headings and footnotes are welcome but not mandatory.
g) Images, with full captions, to accompany the final text are welcome but not mandatory.
h) A proposal should be sent by e-mail to alpare [@] espaceartactuel [.] com as soon as possible before the deadline. The editor-in-chief’s preliminary approval of this proposal does not mean that the submission of the completed text is accepted. The editorial committee must still review the final text for acceptance or rejection.

The next deadline for the Events section is May 4, 2020.

3. FEATURE section

a) For the Feature section, we would like original texts of 1500 to 2000 words (including footnotes) on the theme addressed, along with relevant case studies.
b) Headings are welcome for clarity, but not mandatory
c) Footnotes are welcome, but should not exceed 20.
d) The text will not include a bibliography.
e) Images, with full captions, to accompany the final text are welcome but not mandatory.
f) A proposal should be sent by e-mail to alpare [@] espaceartactuel [.] com as soon as possible before the deadline. The editor-in-chief’s preliminary approval of this proposal does not mean that the submission of the completed text is accepted. The editorial committee must still review the final text for acceptance or rejection.

The next deadline for the Feature section is May 4, 2020.

No. 126 (Fall 2020)
FEATURE: “Laboratories”
CO-DIRECTION: Aseman Sabet

An emblematic feature of the scientific research world, the notion of the laboratory comprises a wealth of variations, which prove to be particularly fruitful when transposed into the art world. Already in 1939, the first director of the MoMA, Alfred Barr, suggested that the young institution be viewed as a laboratory, a place for experimentation in which the public is invited to actively participate. Since then, this interest in the experimental dimension within the museum has grown, notably appearing under the guise of various “laboratories” with an educational aim, or through an association with actual research laboratories in the visual arts. Beyond museums, this exploratory disposition is, of course, expressed directly in the artist studio. Art history is very revealing in this regard: the studio as a site for technical, material and conceptual explorations goes back to well before the 20th century, as is borne out by exemplary figures such De Vinci, who combined artistic and scientific interventions, or Vermeer, who handled pigments with the precision of a chemist.

While the artist studio continues to be a space for trial and error over the centuries, some contemporary practices testify to process-based approaches that have a more direct impact on the resulting works. For instance, works that tangibly make use of new technologies or scientific processes and concurrently challenge the codes and lexicons of their mediums. Based on a temporality that unfolds in duration, they combine various collection, sampling, analysis, validation and iteration strategies. At the same time, it is important to not lose sight of the laboratory as a subject in its own right. Ranging from highly realistic representations to highly metaphorical ones, the laboratory imaginary—with its deep historical roots—fosters current practices and opens new avenues for the arts and science relationship.

On the production side, other phenomena are worth considering. Though the close collaboration between artists and scientists (or specialized technicians) echoes the often interdisciplinary character of laboratory work, the growing presence of research groups or researcher collectives in exhibition programs or major arts events provides other lines of approach. In some cases, the joint research of various specialists makes it possible to introduce a variety of epistemological approaches into an artistic framework, or to lay bare social, political and economic realities that are based on thorny power relations. When these collaborative approaches connect the research with an investigation in a discovery driven inquiry perspective, they inscribe agency, understood as the capacity to initiate and guide transformative actions, as the laboratory’s operative principle.

In this perspective, the classical materials and tools of scientific experimentation are increasingly making way for diverse data, derived from communication systems, statistical or visual databanks, field data, to name but these incidences, thus echoing the actor-network theory according to which every entity, human or non-human (objects, discourses, corporations, etc.) constructs society and makes it possible to elucidate its contours. Hence, the idea of society as a laboratory that directly calls forth forms of artistic experimentation in urban or virtual citizen space. In this regard, it is also pertinent to take a closer look at the renewal of artistic strategies that seek to escape the institution in order to act directly in the social arena where they are being carried out. In following this idea, the principle of the laboratory can be transposed to the reception side, in particular when artists set out to destabilize or overthrow perceptual modes, or at least to think of viewers as a free variable, a random datum to be worked with.

Finally, there is the scientific laboratory itself. The study of the cognitive modes involved in artistic creation or aesthetic experience is fostering new fields of knowledge in extension to the psychology of perception. This has led to the emergence of specialized researchers, notably in neuroaesthetics, a nascent discipline that uses the tools and paradigms of the neurosciences to elucidate our psychological responses to art. While this research has its methodological limits, especially when it comes to defining what one understands by art in a medical laboratory, the developments that are taking place there are not only worthy of interest, they also provide feedback on the pertinence of encouraging contact between visual arts research and scientific research.

With these ideas as a departure point, this feature section of ESPACE magazine seeks to gather texts that foreground current practices and which sound out and mobilize the semantic and practical potential of laboratories. If you would like to submit an article, we invite you, as a first step, to email the magazine’s editor André-Louis Paré before March 2, 2020 at alpare[@]espaceartactuel[.]com and present a summary of your proposal. We will inform you promptly if your proposal is accepted. Your completed text should not exceed 2000 words, footnotes included, and must be received by May 4, 2020. The honorarium is $65 per page of 250 words.